What is financial kiting?

Kiting is the fraudulent use of a financial instrument to obtain additional credit that is not authorized. Kiting encompasses two main types of fraud: Issuing or altering a check or bank draft, for which there are insufficient funds.

What is check kiting example?

Check-kiting examples

Simple check-kiting: Say, for example, that you write yourself a check for $500 from checking account A, and deposit that check into checking account B — but the balance in checking account A is only $75. Then, you promptly withdraw the $500 from checking account B.

How do you determine kiting in accounting?

Indicators of Check Kiting

  1. A large number of check deposits each day.
  2. Many checks are drawn on the same bank.
  3. A large proportion of cash in an account that has not yet cleared the paying bank.
  4. Deposits being made through multiple bank branches, in order to make the volume of deposits less obvious to the bank staff.

What is kiting auditing?

Definition: Kiting, also called check kiting, is a fraudulent scheme that uses checks to embezzle money from a business. Kiting is usually committed by a bookkeeper or someone else with access to company checks and the ability to forge checks, but it can also be used by the company.

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Why is it called check kiting?

The term “check kiting” first came into use in the 1920s. It stemmed from a 19th-century practice of issuing IOUs and bonds with zero collateral. That practice became known as flying a kite, as there was nothing to support the loan besides air.

Do banks prosecute check kiting?

In the United States, check kites are prosecuted under Title 18, U.S. Code Section 1344, which is defined as obtaining the funds of a federal bank under false pretenses. In effect, a check kite is obtaining an interest-free loan from a bank without the bank’s knowledge.

How do banks make money on float?

The float is essentially double-counted money: a paid sum which, due to delays in processing, appears simultaneously in the accounts of the payer and the payee. Individuals and companies alike can use float to their advantage, gaining time or earning interest before payment clears their bank.

Is kiting illegal in Canada?

The problem be- came prevalent enough that it was made illegal in certain states of the U.S. by the early 1920s. In Canada, there is currently no provision of the Criminal Code (the “Code”) that specifically addresses kiting.

What can a company do to prevent kiting?

How to prevent Check Kiting

  1. Only accept checks for the exact amount owed to you. …
  2. Wait until the check clears to refund the overpayment. …
  3. Look into checks that clear your bank account out of sequence. …
  4. Restrict access to company checks if you’re a business owner.

What is the difference between lapping and kiting?

What is the difference between lapping and kiting? Lapping occurs when cash is stolen upon receipt from one customer’s account. … Kiting occurs when funds are stolen from the company and, to cover this theft, the employee transfers money from one bank account to another account right before year-end.

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What is teeming and lading?

A term used to describe attempts to hide the loss of cash received from one customer by using cash from other customers to replace it. This fraud can carry on by using cash from other customers in the same way. An investigation into teeming and lading has been raised against the organisation.

Why is kiting a check illegal?

Under California state law, Penal Code § 476a is how check kiting is prosecuted. … This can occur when one writes a check on an account one knows was closed earlier or one tries to cash a check on an account one knows is empty or insufficient to cover the check.

Is check kiting money laundering?

Kiting can occur within a bank because criminals will open multiple accounts within multiple organizations in order to commit kiting, and bank employees are not aware the criminal has already opened multiple accounts. … Banks are susceptible to money laundering within the organization.